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Our country would not be the great nation it is today without its reliable interconnected transportation
network. The bridges we’ve built are an integral part of that network. Our success comes from working
smart. We rely on our own in-house construction engineers and experienced field supervisors, who
leverage state-of-the-art equipment and techniques.


We have developed our bridge-building expertise through years of experience. Our substructure experience includes concrete pile, steel pile, cofferdams, floating caissons, drilled shafts and spread footings on rock. Our superstructure experience includes plate girders, trusses, cast-in- place concrete, precast concrete, segmental and cable-stayed bridges.

NEW MISSISSIPPI RIVER BRIDGE — ST. LOUIS, MO
Construction of the $229.5 million main span of the New Mississippi River Bridge in St. Louis, MO, for the Missouri Department of Transportation began in January 2010. The cable-stayed portion of the project consists of a 1,500 foot long main span (the third longest in the US) with two 636 foot long end spans. Each of the two main (river) piers are founded on six 11’-6” diameter drilled shafts with 11’ diameter rock sockets. The 400 foot tall delta shaped piers support the superstructure with 34 pairs of stay cables. When completed, the new bridge will carry two lanes of Interstate 70 traffic each way between downtown St. Louis and the Metro-East. (Rendering courtesy of MoDOT)

CUMBERLAND LAKE BRIDGES — SOMERSET, KENTUCKY
Massman was the successful bidder on three separate highway bridges over Lake Cumberland in central Kentucky. Lake Cumberland is known for its steep rock bluffs and deep water. These features made access to the work site difficult and working in water up to 110 feet deep very challenging. The piers on these bridges were founded on 11’ diameter drilled shafts – the largest ever constructed by the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet.

RIGOLETS PASS BRIDGE — SLIDELL, LOUISIANA
This new bridge for the Louisiana DOT is on the eastern end of Lake Pontchartrain and is on one of the city of New Orleans most heavily traveled hurricane evacuation routes. The project included turn-key construction of the new bridge as well as removal of the old bridge and featured driven concrete pile weighing over 100 tons each.

I-95 ALTAMAHA RIVER BRIDGE — BRUNSWICK, GEORGIA
Replacement of two bridges, under traffic, on one of the busiest stretches of interstate highway in the country proved particularly challenging. In addition to overcoming very difficult traffic and sequencing issues, since the Altamaha River region is a breeding ground for manatees and an environmentally sensitive area, the Massman team also had to be vigilant of its surroundings during construction of the new bridge and demolition of the old bridge.

BILOXI BAY BRIDGE — BILOXI, MISSISSIPPI
The U.S. 90 Biloxi Bay Bridge was destroyed by Hurricane Katrina. This $338 million
design-build project included design and construction of new 1.6 mile twin structures over an active railroad track; and, demolition and removal of the old bay bridge. All of this work had to be completed on a very fast track 21-month schedule.

GREENVILLE MISSISSIPPI RIVER BRIDGE —
GREENVILLE, MISSISSIPPI
This new cable stayed bridge is a marvel of engineering as well as an aesthetic delight. With two concrete towers soaring 425 feet above the river, concrete piers anchored 120 feet into the river bed and four fans of prestressing strand steel cable, the new bridge has a main span of 1,378 feet, one of the longest bridge spans of any type in North America.

WILLIAM EMERSON MISSISSIPPI RIVER BRIDGE (EAST APPROACH) —
CAPE GIRARDEAU, MISSOURI
This project consisted of building ten piers, an abutment and erecting structural steel for the eastern approach to a new cable stayed bridge. The project featured 6’ diameter drilled shafts with 5.5’ rock sockets constructed in very pervious rock. The project was recognized state-wide by the Missouri Department of Transportation for Outstanding Overall Performance and
Outstanding Safety Performance.

Louisiana Highway 1, Phase 1-B and 1-C, Port Fourchon to Leeville —
LaFourche Parish, LA
This $162 million project for the LA Department of Transportation and Development consisted of 4 miles of elevated roadway approaches and ramps with a new fixed main span bridge across navigable Bayou Lafourche at Leeville. The majority of the work required marine equipment and included the installation of 280,000 feet of 16 to 30-inch concrete piling (2,240 piles), 40,000 cubic yards of cast-in-place concrete, and 87,000 feet of precast girders.

Interstate 10 Bridge over Lake Pontchartrain, Main Spans — New Orleans, LA
This $169 million project for the LA Department of Transportation and Development consisted of constructing two new 5,780 foot twin bridges for the I-10 over Lake Pontchartrain, adjacent to the bridges that were severely damaged by Hurricane Katrina. The bridges consist of 36-inch square concrete piles, reinforced concrete bent caps, waterline footings, columns and pier caps, BT-78 precast concrete girders, structural steel main spans, and a poured in place concrete deck.

Huey P. Long Bridge Widening, Approaches — New Orleans, LA
This $434 million project for the LA Department of Transportation and Development was the final phase of a $1 billion program to strengthen and widen this major Mississippi River crossing to current structural and traffic standards. It consisted of building approximately 1 mile of pile supported bridge structures and associated ramp and roadway work on each side of the river, and replacing the bridge deck on the 2400 ft.-long main span river crossing.